Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Coastal BC Plants: Pacific Ninebark

N is for Pacific Ninebark

During early summer, Wayne and I went on a camping trip to Vancouver Island to go quad riding on the logging roads and trails northwest of Campbell River. While we were riding north of McCreight Lake, we found an old logging road heading off into the bush.

We followed it for about a klick and came out into a meadow filled with Sweet Gale.

A creek ran through the meadow and nearby I found a large shrub covered with clusters of white flowers. From a distance it blended into the trees bordering the meadow.

A large Pacific Ninebark shrub in the middle of the forefront.

Pacific Ninebark (Physocarpus capitatus) is a member of the rose (Rosaceae) family. It grows to 4 metres (13 feet) in height. The leaves are palmate, deeply veined, serated on the edges, and have 3 to 5 lobes. They are a shiny green and lush looking.


The flowers form in clusters.  Each has five round white petals with yellow pistils and 30 stamens with long filaments.



Some of the clusters flowers changing into red seeds pods.



Here's a branch that contains both flowers and seeds.

Flowers and seeds are present in early summer.

When you take an old road into the bush, you never know what you may find. What kinds of things have you discovered?

Reference: E-Flora BC: Electronic Atlas of the Flora of British Columbia (online) and "Plant Parts" at The Great Plant Escape (online).

For ABC pictures from around the world, stop by the ABC Wednesday blog. This is the twenty-first round of the meme originally established by Denise Nesbitt. It has now being maintained by Melody and her team.  -- Margy

15 comments:

  1. What a beautiful flower and photos and great time for you and Wayne ~ ^_^

    A ShutterBug Explores ~ aka (A Creative Harbor)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was interesting to see it in many stages from buds to flowers to seeds. - Margy

      Delete
  2. Looks an awful lot like our Ninebark.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Probably slight differences from interior to coast, but sounds like not much. - Margy

      Delete
  3. The leaves and flowers remind me of strawberries. Now I must go find out if strawberries are in the rose family. The Husband and I enjoy going down an unknown road, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right, but are in the rose family. - Margy

      Delete
  4. That is beautiful... nature gives us countless presents doesn't it

    Have a splendid, ♥-warming ABC-WEDNES-day / - week
    ♫ M e l ☺ d y ♫ (abc-w-team)
    http://melodymusic.nl/21-n/

    ReplyDelete
  5. You two are certainly adventurous in nature.
    Ann

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Especially in the summer. Now that rain and cooler weather has arrived we tend to stay closer to home. - Margy

      Delete
  6. Thank you Margy for your comment -you can see I received it:) I live at 3000 feet but fires (smoke) seems to slow down the internet connection. Also, I live at 3000 feet close to s very small town, so there are not as many people working/watching it) You made quite a switch moving from California to up North! Yeah, this year the fires are wide spread, at least about 20 of them, counting them throughout summer.
    You made a lovely trip here! Love these pretty wild flowers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fires have been terrible this year in many areas. We are so lucky that we only experienced the smoke. - Margy

      Delete
  7. Hello, sounds like a nice day on the trails. I have seen a similar plant growing here. They are pretty. I thought eventually the plant would have berries?
    Enjoy your day!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. From the looks of this plant it only gets red seeds. - Margy

      Delete
  8. I love NATURE'S design

    ROG, ABCW

    ReplyDelete